Video

Katy Grannan’s “The Nine” at the Mill Valley Film Festival

THE NINE | TRAILER (2015) from Katy Grannan on Vimeo.

In two weeks, Katy Grannan’s first feature film, The Nine will be screening at the Mill Valley Film Festival.

Katy Grannan’s intimate documentary explores the lives of those who struggle with their past tragedies and current addictions. The filmmaker’s delicate but deepening focus on the mystery of Kiki—whose clinging, childlike world-view belongs to someone a fraction of her actual age—looks for answers in those around her, who still dream of reuniting with their children, working a garden, running a mud wrestling club. Despite their ravaged lives, their songs burst out with a terrible and unflinching beauty.

Screenings:
Tuesday, 11 October at The Cinearts Sequoia 2, 9:00pm
Wednesday, 12 October at The Lark Theater, 2:30pm

For more information on The Nine or to purchase tickets, please visit the Mill Valley Film Festival website.
For more information on Katy Grannan, please visit her artist page.

Richard Learoyd and Frish Brandt – Photo London Talks 2016

Artist Richard Learoyd tells the story of how he first began his lifelong experiments with photography and talks about the relationships that have supported him in his pursuit of his craft, in conversation with his dealer and friend Frish Brandt of Fraenkel Gallery. Frish has represented Richard for many years and provides another fascinating perspective on his photographic practice.

Art Is… Going to a Dark Place | SFMOMA Shorts

In this SFMOMA short four artists, including Robert Adams and Richard Misrach, discuss how creating art has helped them cope with disturbing themes such as fear, trauma, and war. The artists address how going to these “dark places” has fostered the discovery of profound beauty and insight.

To want to make pictures is fundamentally to want to share something that you have seen of value, and that you suspect maybe people haven’t paid enough attention to. The American West has been my primary subject, particularly the landscape. They are frightening landscapes and the only way I can get over my own anxiety about them is to go and keep working. – Robert Adams

From the series SFMOMA shorts video posting on 6, June, 2016
To learn more about Robert Adams, please visit his artist page.
To learn more about Richard Misrach, please visit his artist page.

The Museum of Modern Art Launches Free Online Course about photography

 

The Museum of Modern Art is now offering a free online course, “Seeing Through Photographs”, that focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of photography as an art form.  Featured in the course are videos with Nicholas Nixon and Katy Grannan as well as other prominent photographers.

To learn more or sign up, visit the “Seeing Through Photographs” course page.

To learn more about Nicholas Nixon, please visit his artist page.

To learn more about Katy Grannan, please visit her artist page.

Richard Learoyd demonstrates his process

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In this video, photographer Richard Learoyd demonstrates how to make a picture using the large camera obscura he built in his studio.

They’re different to other photographs because they emit the sensation that is a little more human somehow. They are never really described as prints because there isn’t a print. You know the print is the photograph and the photograph is the print. There’s not the opportunity to make more than one version of the picture because that moment is passed. There is no negative. There is no transparency. There’s no digital file. –Richard Learoyd

From the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art online video from May 2015.

To learn more about Learoyd’s work, please visit his artist page.

 

 

Richard Misrach In Conversation With LA Review of Books

In this interview by LA Review of Books, Richard Misrach discusses his career as a photographer since his earliest series, “Telegraph 3 A.M.” to his more recent series, “On The Beach.”

So even though my subject matter is sometimes very much of the news, like the U.S. border maybe, or a nuclear test site, or a bombing range. Something like that could be also a father for journalism, a legitimate father for journalism. I try to make what I would consider more like in relation to historical paintings, like history paintings. Using photographs to make images so visual, that 30, 40 years from now, people look back at it, and it’ll represent this historical moment. –Richard Misrach

From the LA Review of Books online posting on 6 July 2015.

To learn more about Misrach’s work, please visit his artist page.

Alec Soth & Stacey Baker: This Is What Enduring Love Looks Like

In this video, Alec Soth and Stacey Baker explore how couples meet for TED.

Now, the most beautiful to me as a photographer is the quality of vulnerability. The physical exterior reveals a crack in which you can get a glimpse at a more fragile interior. At this date-a-thon event, I saw so many examples of that. But as I watched Stacey’s dates and talked to her about them, I realized how different photographic love is from real love. What is real love? How does it work? –Alec Soth

From the TED online posting from March 2015.

To learn more about Soth’s work, please visit his artist page.

Ralph Eugene Meatyard in “Arts in Context Shorts: Wildly Strange”

In this video by Arts in ContextJessica McDonald, Simone Wicha, and Dr. Coleman Hutchison discuss Wildly Strange: The Photographs of Ralph Eugene Meatyard presented by the Blanton Museum of Art and the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Meatyard wore one mask to work, he wore one mask at home, he wore another when he was discussing literature and film with his friends from the English faculty. He probably wore a different mask when he was going out to the abbey to meet the Thomas Merton. We all take on different personas or wear different masks in different parts of our lives. Meatyard was a little league coach, he was the head of the local PTA but at the same time he’s really pushing all the boundaries of his art in photography and creating works that even push and sometimes confuse his colleagues that have the same goals as he has. –Jessica McDonald

From the KLRU online posting by Brenna Pollock on 5 June 2015.

To learn more about Wildly Strange, please visit here.

To learn more about Meatyard’s work, please visit his artist page.

Richard Learoyd demonstrates his process

Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 3.49.17 PM

 

In this video, photographer Richard Learoyd demonstrates how to make a picture using the large camera obscura he built in his studio.

They’re different to other photographs because they emit the sensation that is a little more human somehow. They are never really described as prints because there isn’t a print. You know the print is the photograph and the photograph is the print. There’s not the opportunity to make more than one version of the picture because that moment is passed. There is no negative. There is no transparency. There’s no digital file. –Richard Learoyd

From the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art online video from May 2015.

To learn more about Learoyd’s work, please visit his artist page.

 

 

Richard Misrach Interview for American Suburb X

Richard Misrach, in an interview for American Suburb X, discusses his collaborative project with composer Guillermo Galindo on the Mexican-American Border crossing. Misrach takes abandoned objects he finds at the border, photographs them, and sends them to Galindo, who then transforms them into musical instruments.

This whole border project really is an extension of my Desert Cantos,…you look at landscape, but it’s not really landscape, it’s a symbol for our country, it’s a metaphor for our country. –Richard Misrach

From an interview by Brad Feuerhelm at Paris Photo Fair from November 2014.

To learn more about Misrach’s work, please visit his artist page.

Alec Soth interview at Fraenkel Gallery

Alec Soth sat down with us to chat about his current exhibition Songbook, on view through 4 April 2015.

A lot of the language surrounding Songbook is about community and American culture…and that stuff’s in there, but actually what I wanted to do with it is talk to something more primal, more internal, and more about the human condition than the American condition. It’s the great problem of consciousness. Alec Soth

To learn more about Soth’s work, please visit his artist page.

Alec Soth on Influence, Summer Nights, and Allen Ginsberg

 

In an interview with Aperture Remix‘s curator, Lesley A. Martin, Alec Soth discusses the influence of Robert Adams and Allen Ginsberg on his work. He emphasizes the importance of finding his own voice, and finding what moves him. The interview also includes a video, which takes the place of still photography, and serves as a response to the work of Robert Adams.

But for me to have an authentic voice, I need to follow whatever stirs me. Maybe it would make me a better citizen if I read Wendell Berry rather than watched Breaking Bad, but it wouldn’t make me a better artist. –Alec Soth

From the Aperture online posting from 8 November 2012.
To learn more about Soth’s work, please visit his artist page.

Art Biennale 2011 – Christian Marclay (Interview)

In an interview at the Art Biennale Venice, Christian Marclay, who also won a Golden Lion for best artist at the ILLUMInations Exhibtion, discussed his project, The Clock.

I think it has an appeal because everybody is concerned with time, you know, you never have enough time to do anything, especially to see art. And in Venice, there’s so much art to see, and so little time, so it’s a real challenge.          –Christian Marclay

From the la Biennale di Venezia YouTube channel from 6 June 2011.
To learn more about Marclay’s work, please visit his artist page.

Garry Winogrand at Jeu de Paume

In this short video, curators at the Jeu de Paume discuss the work of the late photographer, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984), known for his images of American life. Winogrand’s images are currently on view at the Jeu de Paume (14 October 2014 – 8 February 2015), and is the first retrospective in twenty-five years. Divided into three sections, the exhibition allows viewers an opportunity to see images that were previously unprinted, and some that have never been exhibited before.

When I’m photographing, I don’t see a picture, I see faces. –Garry Winogrand

From the Jeu de Paume / magazine online posting from 12 November 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

Making of – installation de l’exposition Winogrand

RATP, in partnership with the Jeu de Paume, shows how it transformed some of the Paris Metro stations into an exhibition space showcasing several images by the late photographer, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984). His photographs are on view at 16 different stations throughout Paris from 14 October 2014 to 8 February 2015, and are intended to complement the current retrospective at the Jeu de Paume, which also ends on 8 February 2015.

From the RATP YouTube channel from 30 October 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please see his artist page.

Video Interview with Nicholas Nixon

Nicholas Nixon sat down with us to talk about his series “The Brown Sisters,” which celebrates its 40th Anniversary this year.  The series, which began in 1974, depicts Nixon’s wife, Bebe, and her three sisters.

We’re all aware of time passing and us not being aware of it while it’s passing…so seeing the sisters, for a lot of people, just gives them the sort of reliable marker that a year has passed. –Nicholas Nixon

To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Hiroshi Sugimoto talks to designboom

In an interview with designboom, Hiroshi Sugimoto discusses his glass tea house, “Mondrian,” a temporary structure designed for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale.

I decided that a japanese transliteration of the name ‘mondrian’ would be an ideal name. I combined three characters that betoken ‘a modest house where one can hear the birds sing.’ I like to think that this tea house was designed by Mondrian after he heard Sen no Rikyû speaking to him through the singing of the birds. –Hiroshi Sugimoto

From the designboom online posting by Nina Azzarello on 4 June 2014.
To learn more about Sugimoto’s work, please visit his artist page

Robert Adams retrospective at the Jeu de Paume

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To accompany a Robert Adams retrospective entitled “The Place We Live” (L’endroit où nous vivons), running through 18 May 2014, the Jeu de Paume has released a video detailing some of the projects Adams has pursued over the course of his career, including his early influences and interests.

From the Jeu de Paume online posting by Terra Luna Films on 22 February 2014.
To learn more about Adams’ work, please visit his artist page.

Timothy Potts of The J. Paul Getty Museum Interviews Hiroshi Sugimoto


An interview with Hiroshi Sugimoto is featured in the online magazine of the Getty Center. In the video, Hiroshi Sugimoto and J. Paul Getty Museum Director Timothy Potts discuss Sugimoto’s artistic process and his interest in the works of William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the “photogenic drawing.” In 2007, Sugimoto created photographs of Talbot’s 175-year old prints. Those works are included in the exhibition Hiroshi Sugimoto: Past Tense, which runs at the J. Paul Getty Museum from 4 February 2014 through 8 June 2014.

A photographer never makes an actual subject; they just steal the image from the world. –Hiroshi Sugimoto

From The Getty Iris online posting by Annelisa Stephan on 14 April 2014.
To learn more about Sugimoto’s work, please visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon Interview

 

In advance of the 40th Anniversary of his series The Brown Sisters, Nicholas Nixon sat down with us to discuss the evolution of the project, which depicts Nixon’s wife, Bebe, and her three sisters.

We’re all aware of time passing and us not being aware of it while it’s passing…So seeing the sisters, for a lot of people, just gives them a sort of reliable marker that a year has passed. –Nicholas Nixon

To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

An Evening with Nan Goldin and Vince Aletti: Remembering Peter Hujar

On January 8th, Fraenkel Gallery hosted a dialogue about the work of Peter Hujar, on the occasion of the exhibition Love & Lust. On hand were Vince Aletti, respected photography critic for The New Yorker, and Nan Goldin, whose 1980s work The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, produced a sea-change in the photographic medium. Both were intimate friends of Hujar’s. The evening was moderated by Jeffrey Fraenkel.

Goldin’s exhibition Nine Self-Portraits runs concurrently with Love & Lust.
Purchase the exhibition catalogue for Love & Lust here.

 

Video: Vince Aletti on Peter Hujar’s Love & Lust

Vince Aletti, photography critic for The New Yorker, and friend of Peter Hujar, reflects on his relationship with the artist.

Peter was equally interested in people, men and women, people of all ages, he was incredibly open kind of across the board, and there were no restrictions in terms of his interests and people. –Vince Aletti

To learn more about Hujar’s work, please visit his artist page