Garry Winogrand: Airports and Animals

Fraenkel Gallery is pleased to announce Airports and Animals, an exhibition of two important bodies of work by the photographer Garry Winogrand.

Winogrand’s zoo, even if true, is a grotesquery. It is a surreal Disneyland where unlikely human beings and jaded careerist animals stare at each other through bars, exhibiting bad manners and a mutual failure to recognize their own ludicrous predicaments.  – John Szarkowski

 

Garry Winogrand’s The Animals was first exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 1969. It was Winogrand’s first one-man exhibition and had a legendary impact on an entire generation of photographers that continues until this day. The catalog the museum published to accompany the exhibition has long since been out of print. MoMA has recently republished this classic from the history of photography. The gallery has gathered prints from a number of sources in order to convey the spirit of the original exhibition.

For Garry Winogrand, airplanes, like bridges and tunnels, brought on a cold sweat. Probably he started photographing seriously at airports because he had made a few good pictures at times and had recognized the airport as a way to assuage his own anxiety about the coming plane trip. He would arrive at the airport very early so as to have time to watch and then get lost in his work. What was reaped was the rich bounty held between these book covers.  – Lee Friedlander

Before his untimely death in 1984 Garry Winogrand was working on a book of photographs that he had made in airports over the prior two decades. The project sat in limbo until recently, when Lee Friedlander (Winogrand’s good friend and a monumental artist in his own right) selected the photographs for the book Arrivals and Departures: The Airport Pictures of Garry Winogrand. Apart from a few airport photographs that were included in Winogrand’s 1988 MoMA retrospective, this is the first time the photographs have been exhibited together.

Garry Winogrand began photographing in 1948, when he was twenty. He received many major awards for his photography including a grant from the NEA and two Guggenheim fellowships, and his work is included in virtually every major museum collection of photography around the world.

 

New York, 1963