Nicholas Nixon

A Photographer’s Eye

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Nicholas Nixon discusses his recent work with the New York Times LENS Blog.

It’s the thing you focus on when you are photographing people, it’s the thing you look at with people instinctively to see if you trust them or not. — Nicholas Nixon

From the New York Times LENS posting by Rena Silverman on 8 June 2016.
To learn more about Nixon’s work and publications, please visit his artist page.

The Guardian reviews 40 years of the Brown Sisters

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Seth O’Hagan of The Guardian reviewed Nicholas Nixon’s “The Brown Sisters” series. The article explores his initial inspiration to make the portraits, how the sisters age differently over time, and what the viewer can intimately feel through these four strangers.

It is, among other things, a testament to the power of one great, simple idea. Out of that idea, though, Nixon has made a series with an extraordinary cumulative power that rests on photography’s singular ability to capture the passage of time and, with it, human aging and the lurking shadow of mortality. –Seth O’Hagan

From The Guardian online posting by Seth O’Hagan on 19 November 2014.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon’s Brown Sisters at MoMA

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MoMA will exhibit Nicholas Nixon: Forty Years of The Brown Sisters in the Museum Lobby from November 22nd, 2014 until January 4th, 2015. Since 2006, the Museum has acquired the series both as tactile contact prints and as 20 x 24″ enlargements. This upcoming installation will feature all 40 images and will be the first time the museum has displayed the full series in this scale.

From the MoMA online posting from 4 November 2014
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon Interviewed by To The Best of our Knowledge Radio

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Nicholas Nixon was interviewed by TTBook Radio about his experience creating his series “Old People & Patients” and “People with AIDS.” Many of the images in these series are the visual outcomes from his years as a volunteer for people in nursing homes. Nixon intimately speaks here about his influences, process, and on “giving the brightness depth.”

Individuality. Showing individuals. Showing their spirit. Showing their family. Showing it in an unprejudiced way that had no agenda except a certain amount of passion and clarity. –Nicholas Nixon

From the To The Best of our Knowledge (TTBook) online posting from 10 November 2014.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page

 

In the New York Times Magazine: Forty Portraits in Forty Years

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For the 40th anniversary of Nicholas Nixon’s The Brown Sisters, The New York Times Magazine is featuring the entire photo series–including the debut of the 2014 photo. The accompanying article by Susan Minot discusses the emotional impact of the works, as well as ideas of aging and sisterhood.

But the more we study the images, the more we see that aging does not define these women. Even as the images tell us, in no uncertain terms, that this is what it looks like to grow old, this is the irrefutable truth, we also learn: This is what endurance looks like. –Susan Minot

From The New York Times Magazine online posting by Susan Minot from 5 October 2014.
Hear Nicholas Nixon speaking about the evolution of this series in our video interview.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Video Interview with Nicholas Nixon

Nicholas Nixon sat down with us to talk about his series “The Brown Sisters,” which celebrates its 40th Anniversary this year.  The series, which began in 1974, depicts Nixon’s wife, Bebe, and her three sisters.

We’re all aware of time passing and us not being aware of it while it’s passing…so seeing the sisters, for a lot of people, just gives them the sort of reliable marker that a year has passed. –Nicholas Nixon

To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon Interview

 

In advance of the 40th Anniversary of his series The Brown Sisters, Nicholas Nixon sat down with us to discuss the evolution of the project, which depicts Nixon’s wife, Bebe, and her three sisters.

We’re all aware of time passing and us not being aware of it while it’s passing…So seeing the sisters, for a lot of people, just gives them a sort of reliable marker that a year has passed. –Nicholas Nixon

To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Idris Khan and Nicholas Nixon

Idris Khan

Idris Khan created every…Nicholas Nixon’s Brown Sisters, 2004 by layering the portraits Nicholas Nixon made of over a twenty-year period of his wife and her three sisters. In compiling multiple images into one, Khan creates a unique image, while also changing the way we approach the originals.

A lot of people in the art world hate to use the word ‘Photoshop’, like it’s cheating or easy or something. I say bollocks to thatfor me, it’s my tool, my paintbrush if you like, and lets me create my own visual language. –Idris Khan

From The Guardian interview with Khan on 31 August 2007.
To learn more about Khan’s work, please visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon: New Work

We sat down with Nicholas Nixon to discuss his current exhibition of new work:

When you honor the thing that’s specific in front of you, beautifully, and you’re really clear and you’re really inspired…once in a while it gets wings. –Nicholas Nixon

From the Fraenkel Gallery online posting on 19 June 2013.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

NICHOLAS NIXON IN AHORN MAGAZINE

Nicholas Nixon - Muddy River, Boston

Nicholas Nixon discusses his technical relationship with the cameras he uses, and what compelled him to choose a large format camera.

It took a while of doing it every day with subjects I loved. I have tried a score of different cameras, both bigger and smaller, and they all bring me back to the 8×10, but with more freedom and freshness than before. The last big camera I tried was an 11×14, and after two previous times, failures mostly, it has stuck and is what I have been using for 3 or 4 years. The technique is not hard: make everything as light and agreeable to the touch as possible, and work every day with the things that matter a lot to you. –Nicholas Nixon

From ahorn magazine online posting by Daniel Augschöll and Anya Jasbar in 2012.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, visit his artist page.

Nicholas Nixon: New Work is on view 30 May 2013–27 Jul 2013.

Patients, Nicholas Nixon

Nicholas Nixon photographed people with terminal or severe illness in hospitals around Boston for his series,Patients.”  He discusses the interactions with his subjects, their reactions to seeing their portraits and his initial interest in this delicate subject matter.

It’s a part of life we don’t get to see the face of very often. It’s moving, we’re all vulnerable—it’s something that’s looming over all of us. –Nicholas Nixon

From The Morning News online post by Bridget Fitzgerald in 21 January 2008.
To learn more about Nixon’s work, please visit his artist page.

Tuesday Evenings at the Modern Nicholas Nixon

Nicholas Nixon will be speaking Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 7:00pm at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth to discuss the inspiration behind his well-known photographic projects.

An internationally recognized photographer, Nicholas Nixon has helped shape the dialogue of photographic discourse for over four decades. Nixon has explored a vast range of subject matter, including the changing urban landscape in and around Boston, as well as portraits of people who live there.

Tuesday Evenings at the Modern are free and open to the public. Event details can be found on their website.
For more information on Nicholas Nixon, visit his artist page.