Richard Avedon: Richard Avedon: Made In France

And if a day goes by without my doing something related to photography, it’s as though I’ve neglected something essential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to wake up. I know that the accident of my being a photographer has made my life possible. –Richard Avedon

Fraenkel Gallery is pleased to present the exhibition RICHARD AVEDON: Made in France, from November 1 through December 29, 2001.

This exhibition marks an important rediscovery of a small but central body of work in both Avedon’s career and in the history of twentieth century photography. The pictures, made in Paris for Harper’s Bazaar magazine during the 1950s, are the original engraver’s prints made by the legendary master printer André Gremela. The prints are uncropped, on their original mounts, and with the artist’s notations on both front and back. Thus, they provide a remarkable insight into the working methods of one of the twentieth century’s most influential photographers.

Richard Avedon was born in New York in 1923, and after studying photography at the New School during the late 1940s, spent twenty years as a photographer for Harper’s Bazaar, creating many signature images that remain recognizable to this day. He has published many books including Portraits, Nothing Personal, Observations, and Evidence.

This exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated hardcover catalogue, published by Fraenkel Gallery, and with an essay by Judith Thurman, staff writer for The New Yorker.