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Garry Winogrand at Jeu de Paume

In this short video, curators at the Jeu de Paume discuss the work of the late photographer, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984), known for his images of American life. Winogrand’s images are currently on view at the Jeu de Paume (14 October 2014 – 8 February 2015), and is the first retrospective in twenty-five years. Divided into three sections, the exhibition allows viewers an opportunity to see images that were previously unprinted, and some that have never been exhibited before.

When I’m photographing, I don’t see a picture, I see faces. –Garry Winogrand

From the Jeu de Paume / magazine online posting from 12 November 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

Making of – installation de l’exposition Winogrand

RATP, in partnership with the Jeu de Paume, shows how it transformed some of the Paris Metro stations into an exhibition space showcasing several images by the late photographer, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984). His photographs are on view at 16 different stations throughout Paris from 14 October 2014 to 8 February 2015, and are intended to complement the current retrospective at the Jeu de Paume, which also ends on 8 February 2015.

From the RATP YouTube channel from 30 October 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please see his artist page.

Looking at Photos the Master Never Saw: When Images Come to Life After Death

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Many of Winogrand’s photographs included in the current retrospective on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art were printed posthumously.  Arthur Lubow of the New York Times wonders: is the artistry of photography in clicking the shutter or is it in the editing process? Can posthumous prints truly express an artist’s vision?

There is an endless anxiety on the issue of how authorship works in photography. –Jeff Rosenheim, curator in charge of the photography department at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

From the New York Times online posting by Arthur Lubow on 3 July 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

Rediscovering Garry Winogrand’s Vision of America

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Garry Winogrand’s greatness as a street photographer can be much credited to his ever-readiness with his camera.

Unlike Dorthea Lange or Walker Evans, two of Winogrand’s influences who made emotional connections with their subjects, there’s a sense Winogrand took pictures simply because the moment presented itself. –Joe Newman

From The Huffington Post online posting by Joe Newman on 24 June 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

No Moral, No Uplift, Just a Restless ‘Click’ ‘Garry Winogrand,’ a Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum

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Holland Cotter of The New York Times argues that though many of the photographs in the MET’s Garry Winogrand Retrospective slide off the eye, the show is still engrossing as it captures a historical moment.

Winogrand was wrong about photographs’ being unable to change society, as he could have seen firsthand: pictures streaming back from Vietnam fueled public opposition to a war he hated. And he was wrong that art had no place for moral statement, that ambiguity was the only way to go, that what you randomly see is all that matters. On this score, however, his thinking was prescient: It’s the dominant ethic in a cash-bloated art world today. –Holland Cotter

From The New York Times online posting by Holland Cotter on 3 July 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

The Wall Street Journal Reviews Garry Winogrand Retrospective

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Wall Street Journal photography writer William Meyers discusses the Garry Winogrand retrospective on view at the National Gallery of Art through 8 June 2014. This is the first major exhibition on Garry Winogrand since 1988.

Winogrand’s best images are like koans, the Zen riddles asked not to elicit an answer but to prompt contemplation. –William Meyers

From The Wall Street Journal online posting by William Meyers on 1 April 2014.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

Garry Winogrand Retrospective in The Paris Review

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Richard Woodward reviewed the Garry Winogrand retrospective at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, writing that Winogrand would have found ample subjects to photograph at the opening:

 Looking around the opening, it was hard not to compare the people in the photographs with the crowds in the galleries. Gray-haired or balding though his friends are now, the reason for parties doesn’t change. There were still men in black tie (the ideal outfit for a photograph in monochrome) and women in slinky dresses, and the defining public gesture of the evening and our day—hunched figures of all ages staring importantly into their smart phones—suggested that, were Winogrand alive, modern America would give him plenty of material to work with. –Richard Woodward

From The Paris Review online posting by Richard Woodward on 13 May 2013.
For more information on Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

Garry Winogrand in ARTnews

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In this article from ARTnews, Hilarie M. Sheets discusses Garry Winogrand’s first retrospective in 25 years, what it meant for Leo Rubinfien to posthumously edit the 6,600 rolls of unproccessed film and whether Winogrand would approve of the selection.

Garry Winogrand was like a hunter with his camera, ever prowling the crowded streets of New York and the roadways of the nation for the happenstance of human incident. His best-known images from the 1960s—of beautiful women, businessmen, animals, and American spectacles of all kinds—teem with ebullience, humor, and haphazardness. These were qualities shared by the gregarious man himself, who was promoted by the influential Museum of Modern Art photography curator John Szarkowski as the “central photographer of his generation.” –Hilarie M. Sheets

From ARTnews online posting by Hilarie M. Sheets on 27 March 2013.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

From The Archives: Garry Winogrand’s Photographs of the 1960 Democratic National Convention in The New York Times

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Last year, The New York Times posted a collection of Garry Winogrand’s photographs taken at the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. Despite being surrounded by politicians and celebrities, he seemed to focus more on the crowd of admirers than the people everyone was trying to get a glimpse of.

Garry Winogrand took this iconic photograph of John F. Kennedy during his acceptance speech at the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. Until recently, it was the only Winogrand photograph from the convention that had previously been published. –Julie Bosman

From The New York Times online posting by Julie Bosman on 19 April 2012.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

BBC News Reviews Garry Winogrand’s Retrospective at SFMOMA

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In Phil Coomes’s review of Garry Winogrand’s retrospective at SFMOMA for BBC News, he discusses the initial dismissal of Winogrand’s posthumous archives, the eventual curation of them, and the discovery of Winogrand’s camera’s focus during the last decade of his life.

Although dead for nearly 30 years, Winogrand remains a totemic figure to many of today’s generation of street photographers. His ballsy attitude, dynamic and kinetic compositions, and refusal to repeat himself have made him a hero for photographers grappling with the challenges of shooting candid situations in everyday life. Always prodigious, Winogrand left behind 6,500 rolls of film from which he never made prints, or even had processed. For a photographer with a reputation for shooting brilliant images from all corners of America this was a massive amount of material which had never been evaluated – until now. –Phil Coomes

From the BBC News online posting by Phil Coomes on 11 March 2013.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.
To purchase the exhibition catalog, please visit the publication page.

Time Magazine Lightbox Reviews Garry Winogrand’s Retrospective at SFMOMA

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In his review of Garry Winogrand’s retrospective at SFMOMA, Richard Conway talks about the vast expanse of Winogrand’s work, and the charm that made it possible:

A deeply unpretentious and inventive photographer, his frenetic, apparently off-the-cuff pictures descend from the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson and Walker Evans. On the streets, he was a shoot-often kind of guy, one who could get so close to subjects as to either charm or irritate them. Winogrand took so many pictures, in fact, that it is hard to grasp the breadth of his contribution to photography: After his death in 1984 he left behind an estimated 250,000 frames in total, most of which he never saw himself. –Richard Conway

From the Time Magazine Lightbox online posting by Richard Conway on 13 March 2013.
To learn more about Winogrand and his work, please visit his artist page.
To purchase the exhibition catalog, please visit the publication page.

San Francisco Chronicle Reviews Garry Winogrand’s Retrospective at SFMOMA

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In Kenneth Baker’s review of Garry Winogrand’s retrospective at SFMOMA, he discusses the developmental changes in the tonality of Winogrand’s work, the difficulty of curating the exhibit, and Winogrand’s beginnings in photography. The exhibit is on view until the museum’s closing for remodeling on June 2, 2013.

Like many of his pictures, “Garry Winogrand” comes stuffed with information and, even more, with ambiguity. At a moment of when the speed and volume of images have outstripped nearly everyone’s scrutiny, the show is an education in the strangeness and complexity of photographs. –Kenneth Baker

From the San Francisco Chronicle online posting by Kenneth Baker on 8 March 2013.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.
To purchase the exhibition catalog, please visit the publication page.

From the Archives: Garry Winogrand’s “The Man in the Crowd”

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This comprehensive monograph spans three and a half decades, concentrating on the photographs that form the core of Winogrand’s vision. Fewer than half of the images have been published before. Seen together, these images make a clear case for Szarkowski’s claim that Winogrand was “the central photographer of his generation.” With an introduction by Fran Lebowitz and an essay by Ben Lifson.

I look at the pictures I have done up to now, and they make me feel that who we are and what we feel and what is to become of us just doesn’t matter. Our aspirations and successes have become cheap and petty. I read the newspapers, the columnists, some books, I look at the magazines (our press). They all deal in illusions and fantasies. I can only conclude that we have lost ourselves, and that the bomb may finish the job permanently, and it just doesn’t matter, we have not loved life. I cannot accept my conclusions, and so I must continue this photographic investigation further and deeper. –Garry Winogrand, from The Man in the Crowd

To purchase The Man in the Crowd, please visit the publication page.
To learn more about Winogrand and his work, please visit his artist page.

Garry Winogrand Retrospective at SFMOMA in The Huffington Post

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The Huffington Post writes about Garry Winogrand’s forthcoming retrospective (his first in 25 years) at SFMOMA, which will feature over 100 images never before printed:

Winogrand, born in the Bronx in 1928, studied painting before turning to photography. The state of photography in America was somewhere between a budding artistic medium and journalistic technique, and Winogrand expressed American truths with a poetic eye. Whether capturing the overcrowded, amorphous New York streets or a lone sailor hitchhiking on the highway, Winogrand possessed an eye for that funny sense of isolation that lies beneath the American way. –Priscilla Frank

From The Huffington Post online posting by Priscilla Frank on 20 January 2013.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

An Interview with Garry Winogrand (1981)

 

Barbaralee Diamonstein sat down with Garry Winogrand in 1981 to discuss his start in photography, his choice of subject matter, and his distaste for his reputation as a “street photographer.”

I generally deal with something happening. So let’s say that what’s out there is a narrative. Often enough, the picture plays with the question of what actually is happening. Almost the way puns function. They call the meaning of things into question. You know, why do you laugh at a pun? Language is basic to all of our existences in this world. We depend on it. So a pun calls the meaning of a word into question, and it upsets us tremendously. We laugh because suddenly we find out we’re not going to get killed. I think a lot of things work that way with photographs. –Garry Winogrand

From the American Suburb X online posting on 8 October 2008.
To learn more about Winogrand’s work, please visit his artist page.

A PUZZLE IN PICTURES: WINOGRAND IN 1960

In his 1964 application for the Guggenheim Fellowship that would propel him across the United States for “Winogrand 1964,” Garry Winogrand wrote that the mass media “all deal in illusions and fantasies. I can only conclude that we have lost ourselves and that the bomb may finish the job permanently, and it just doesn’t matter, we have not loved life.”

from The New York Times Lens blog piece about Winogrand’s photographs of the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles.

 

Garry Winogrand with Bill Moyers, 1982

This two-part interview between Bill Moyers and Garry Winogrand, conducted in 1982, explores the photographer’s artistic style and philosophy. He explains his thought process on deciding what to shoot and why as well as his theory on photographs being “mute,” capturing only a piece of time and space rather than a narrative story.

A picture is about what’s photographed and how that exists in the photograph—so that’s what we’re talking about. What can happen in a frame? Because photographing something changes it. It’s interesting, I don’t have to have any storytelling responsibility to what I’m photographing. I have a responsibility to describe well. — Garry Winogrand

Part 2 of the interview is available online.
For more information on Garry Winogrand, please visit his artist page.